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UN4GTBL said:
Aldo, it's nice to hear I'm not the only one with an anti-Goodyear bias!

Even the crappy firestones that came on my Caliber didn't have problems, like the Goodyears we've had. Granted they all wore way too fast.
The Goodyear F1 tires are supposed to be one of the best performance tires available, so Chrysler is not cutting corners by mounting these at the factory.

I can see how SRT is in a bind: they need to install tires that enthusiast recognize as high-performance, even though they may not be the most durable. If they were to mount Firestones or Falkens at the plant, we will hear enthusiasts complaining about SRT being cheap.

Personally, I am at the point where I'll take off those Goodyears as soon as I get the car --looks like a nail got ahead of me this time, though... :angry2:
 

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JavelinAMX said:
So, the they'll lean away from supplying the tire and jack.

Does this mean the cavity normally molded-in for those bits will be going, too?
You will get a spare track curled up in that empty cavity :glare:
 

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Agree.

And like some on here have stated: a tow is not a solution (1) if you get a flat after hours, (2) if you get a flat on your only vehicle, or (3) if you get a flat when you are out of cell range.
 

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TWX said:
Pretty much.

I had to replace a tire on my pickup when the pickup had a flat and another tire turned out to have a bubble in the tread (and I originally thought it was just a crappy truck, silly me!) and on a Sunday the only tire place open that I would at-all trust was the Firestone/Bridgestone service center. No Costco, no Discount Tire, no Big-O, etc. In hindsight I suppose that Walmart might have been open for tires, and probably pepboys, but after pepboys broke a lug on the Cordoba and then tried to hide that they did it, I won't let them touch anything on a car ever again if I can absolutely avoid it. No three-stooges of the auto repair industry for me...

Over on the poll, almost half of respondents have had a flat in the last 12 months, and more than 60% have had a flat in the last five years. More tellingly, no one has said that they've never had a flat or haven't had one in 25 years, with 22 respondents as of writing this. That tells me that the ability to properly stow at least a bare-minimum of a spare tire is essential, even if the wheel and tire itself is undersized, light-duty, or even optional equipment. Someone may purchase a vehicle when they live in the heart of a major city with at least one shop open off-hours that can do tires so they wouldn't absolutely need a spare, but if they moved then that might change and if the vehicle can accommodate one, then they could correct the situation even if they have to pay dealer prices to do so.
Yes, you raise a good point: having no choice on what tire --or a set of matching tires-- to get as your car happens to be sitting on a flatbed.

In my particular case this week, having that temporary spare tire gave me the extra leeway to able to order the exact tires I wanted --and at a price I wanted, instead of having to buy whatever tire(s) the shop had available right then and there.

The shop offered to give me a loaner tire, but they didn't have any in stock that fit my car. When you drive a vehicle with a uncommon tires and/or tire sizes (like SRTs and Wranglers do), chances are they won't have a matching tire in stock to sell to you or lend you at that moment, and you find yourself having to make a pretty expensive purchase decision at the point of a gun... --sort of speak.
 

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Doug D said:
Another FWIW - most of the flats I do see in this area (DC metro), the tire is so shreaded it will have to be replaced. Fix-a-Flat ain't fixing it.
Yup. Unless you happen to find one of your tires on the ground when the car is parked, or you have a very slow leak, if you get a flat while driving, chances are you won't have much of a chance to stop to replace it before it gets shredded.

This is exactly what happened to me this week: it appears I drove over a screw, which came off on the freeway as we were doing 80 MPH. The tire lost air very quickly. By the time I managed to slow down, avoid the fast oncoming traffic and find a spot to stop...that tire was SO done.
 

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Let me tell you about Chrysler's Roadside Assistance: it is a joke, and a bad one at that!

Awhile ago now, I blew a front tire on my Challenger, driving on a mountain road north of Los Angeles one Sunday morning. I was 25 miles from the closest tire repair center but had no wireless reception.

I had to limp very slowly 20 miles back until I was able to get cell reception and call Chrysler Roadside Assistance, only to be told that the Roadside Assistance program DOES NOT cover flat tires!!!

With the tire now in tatters, and about to start damaging that expensive SRT rim, I gave my credit card to the rep to send in help. It took the tow truck ANOTHER hour to show up, 45 minutes (and a scraped chin spoiler) to load up the Challenger onto the flatbed, 20 minutes (and $70) to drive the remaining 5 miles, 20 minutes to unload the car, and another hour (and $500 for TWO matching tires) at America's Tire. What started as an intended fun 2-hour Sunday drive ended up as a 5 hour/$600 nightmare!

The following week I went fuming into my trusted CDJR dealership and I gave my Service Manager a piece of my mind, and told him exactly what I thought about Chrysler's so-called Roadside Assistance.

The sticky part is that it's impossible to get a straight answer from Chrysler if flats are or not covered...that is until you actually call R.A.!

He brought up the matter with his Chrysler rep and, perhaps because that Challenger's VIN showed as a Vehicle Replacement, or simply because I have a long-standing relationship with my dealer, but my Service Manager surprised me with a generous offer from Chrysler: purchase an aftermarket spare tire kit and Chrysler will refund you.

I found a guy in AZ assembling spare tire kits for SRTs, Mustangs and Camaros, and sells them for $400/each, shipped. Got the kit, took out that (useless) $2,000 boom box occupying the spare tire well, and mounted the compact spare tire, jack and wrench in its place, and passed the tab to my dealer.

When I traded that Challenger for my current one, I kept the spare tire kit and put in my new car. Now I always carry a spare everywhere I go with the peace of mind that I can get home if I were to get a flat.

BTW, those high performance tires puncture VERY easily which, in my mind, makes it even more unconscionable that Chrysler won't offer neither flat-tire assistance nor a factory spare tire.
 
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Thanks, Jerry.

So according to this my 2012 Challenger is still NOT covered, but my 2013 Wrangler is?

I am sorry, but this is B.S. Either offer it, no strings attached, or don't bother. The worst part is, while Chrysler keeps making its R.A. Program a moving target, thousands of salespeople and service managers at 1,500 CDJR dealers are telling different things to every customer.

I'll just keep carrying a spare tire to avoid becoming a victim of Chrysler's whim du jour altogether.
 

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AAA and Roadside Assistance have their definite advantages. Especially to cover family members, or when running out of gas, getting a dead battery or locking oneself out.

But in my own personal experience, NOTHING beats a spare tire when you get a flat.
 
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