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It's on the opposite side of the throttle body from where the throttle cable attaches.

Are you getting any symptoms? A code 24 is often not the sensor itself, but deteriorated wiring or a bad connection, so don't replace it until you check it out.

You can see if it's working correctly by using a multimeter. With key on, voltage from center contact to one of the other two wires is about 0.7 volts with throttle closed, and roughly 3.7 to 4.0V volts at wide open throttle. You can also check resistance (preferably with an analog meter) between the center terminal and either of the outer ones. As you open the throttle, resistance should change smoothly with no skips. If it all checks out OK, the sensor is good.

Be sure to check the ground lug and wire connection at the driver's side rear corner of the block. That's the ground for your sensors, and if compromised it can trip fault codes.
 

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The TPS can cause hesitation. It basically is similiar to the volume control on an old TV. Over time it can develope a dead spot which can be detected with an ohm meter (analog is best) as the throttle shaft is moved. There are other items which can cause these symptoms too so test it before laying down your hard earned money.
 

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Often and I would say on our cars (EEK and Daytona) the TPS should not be the first part to replace when troubleshooting a code 24. Look at the link in my signature for troubleshooting drivability issues.

Many times it's the harness connectors. I found that with mine the TPS code 24 was being thrown and when we traced the harness back to the computer I found the spring clips on the ends of the wires at the ECU were defective. They were no longer springing a tight connection at the computer. After replacing 8 or 10 of them my problems and codes disappeared.

That's not to say that you don't have a bad TPS but the first step is to insure that you have a good and solid connection from the TPS connector of the harness all the way back to the computer. Also check grounds. This can also help to cause weird issues.
 

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The ECU (or Power Control Module, among other names) is the computer that's behind the battery on the left fenderwell. It has a 60-pin connector. The logic module is behind the passenger side kickpad. But check the TPS first with a multimeter. I'd check the wiring harness underhood second, as it can get cooked by the heat of the manifolds coming up the backside of the valve cover. Then check the computer connections.
 
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