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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
07 PT Cruiser convertible probably a hundred eighty thousand miles.
So I started a kinda huge task by myself. I replaced my lower control arms, wheel hub assembly, and rotors. I had replaced my brakes at the beginning of all this praying that was my problem but it wasn't. With all of this replaced and looks good, like real good, I'm having a grinding noise while driving slow speeds. I have Jack it up and looked it over at least four times. I cannot figure out where this noise is coming from.
 

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If it's front wheel drive you could have a hanger bearing from the transfer case to the CV axle .. that hanger bearing can make a lot of noise and is easy to replace.
 

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1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
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Definitely sounds like a bearing noise from your description. Locating the noise source is the first step.
I diagnose bearing noises by placing the car on a lift (or very carefully on jack stands). Have a helper inside the car turn off the TRAC control (if equipped), put it in gear and speed up to 15-20 mph.
Walk to the front, by the front wheels (for safety, don't stand in front of the car). Listen to the right and to the left wheels, you should hear the noise. If not, it may be a tire tread noise (sawtooth edge wear pattern) or a rear wheel bearing?
A tire rotation (front to back) helps diagnose tire noises. Sitting in the back seat and turning your head to one side may help determine if the noise is from the rear wheels.
It is also possible (but not common) to have a carrier bearing in the transaxle making a growling noise.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
07 PT Cruiser convertible probably a hundred eighty thousand miles.
So I started a kinda huge task by myself. I replaced my lower control arms, wheel hub assembly, and rotors. I had replaced my brakes at the beginning of all this praying that was my problem but it wasn't. With all of this replaced and looks good, like real good, I'm having a grinding noise while driving slow speeds. I have Jack it up and looked it over at least four times. I cannot figure out where this noise is coming from.
Definitely sounds like a bearing noise from your description. Locating the noise source is the first step.
I diagnose bearing noises by placing the car on a lift (or very carefully on jack stands). Have a helper inside the car turn off the TRAC control (if equipped), put it in gear and speed up to 15-20 mph.
Walk to the front, by the front wheels (for safety, don't stand in front of the car). Listen to the right and to the left wheels, you should hear the noise. If not, it may be a tire tread noise (sawtooth edge wear pattern) or a rear wheel bearing?
A tire rotation (front to back) helps diagnose tire noises. Sitting in the back seat and turning your head to one side may help determine if the noise is from the rear wheels.
It is also possible (but not common) to have a carrier bearing in the transaxle making a growling noise.
Yeah,I just did my bearings and hub. One pressed bad so I had to buy another and have it pressed in as well. Bearings,hubs,rotors,lower control arms,oh yeah and the motor mount on the passengers side. I have been contemplating rotating the tires but haven't done it yet. We've been in a heat advisory for a week or so...Our mosquito population is hungry as ever too..I bought a floor jack last night,guess I need to get to rotating and see if it helps.Thanks!!
 

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1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
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As you are doing the tires, run your hand around the circumference. If you feel a 'ripple' or 'sawtooth' edge-type wear, this may be the noise you are hearing.
You may feel it more depending on which direction (CW or CCW) you are sweeping your hand over the tread. The sad part is that the tires still may have plenty of good tread left.
Scalloping or cupping wear of the tread area can sound like noisy wheel bearings. It will start as a growl and as you speed up, the pitch will increase to a whirr.

 
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