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I'm driving a '90 Grand Voyager 3.3L with around 150K on the odometer and having some of the usual transmission problems I see here. I replaced the solenoid pack a couple of years ago when it started leaking. I still experience clunky shifts, sticky clutch disengagement, and now an increasingly slow engagement on shifting into Drive - about three seconds currently. Reverse works just fine, so I don't think low pump pressure is the problem. Been using ATF+4 since I owned it, about 30K miles.

I am wondering what options I have besides taking this one out for a rebuild. There are a lot of newer units of this type available with less mileage for cheaper than the cost of a rebuild. Also a rebuilt older 3-speed would be workable if the price was right, since I don't drive on the freeway that much. I plan on replacing the speed sensors soon. So I would like to look at which of the other transmissions would bolt up to this engine, and would control modules be a problem. Thanks.
 

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If you aren't getting fault codes or 'limp-in' for the speed sensors, they are probably working fine and I wouldn't worry about them.
There were numerous software updates (flashes) for the TCM that vastly improved shift quality and desensitized the module to intermittent faults (erroneous fault codes). It also added enhanced diagnostics and features. Only the finned case TCM's can be flashed. The smooth case TCM's are obsolete.
If you have the newer finned TCM, look for any 'authorized software update' labels under the hood or on the module housing if it's already been done. The module can be flashed to the latest software (part # 4796122(?) as of 11/95) if it doesn't already have it. Replacing the module with a remanufactured TCM may also get you the latest software, but may be more expensive and unnecessary work. If the dealer flashes the TCM with the latest software, have them check for fault codes before the flash and perform a Quicklearn after the flash.
http://www.robskorner.info/faqs/TSB/18-24-95.pdf
The delayed engagement is probably worn seals and clutches and would only be addressed by a rebuild. There have been so many hardware changes and improvements to the transaxle since 1990 that it may be worth considering a remanufactured unit with all the mechanical/hydraulic improvements and upgrades already included.
We wouldn't consider rebuilding something this old at the dealer level and would just install a 'much improved' reman.
You might consider having this work done if the rest of the van is in good shape and would warrant the expense of a transaxle replacement.
 

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The problem is you can't install a newer transmission due to electrical issues. newer ones would physically bolt in but would not work electronically. Your choices are another used 1990 model transmission, a reman unit or having yours rebuilt.
 

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Agree and the 1990 AC/AS reman 41TE is listed as part # R4741744AB. It comes with a torque converter and new torque converter bolts. Chrysler no longer offers a rebuild kit for any 41TE/A-604 built before 1995. The TRS (transaxle range switch) layout is different in that era.
The 1990 part # is different than the 1989 or the 1991-1992, but that may simply be from different axle gear ratios? These would be the upgraded parts and may have a 3yr/100k warranty.
 
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