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This has been an occasional problem since I got the 93 Daytona in 2009. It has, of course, the dash pod that's shared with 1990-93 Daytona and LeBaron, with the turn signal lever on the pod instead of the steering column. I never had this problem in 17 years with my '92. It will always flash, but sometimes fails to cancel. When it acts up, it always seems to be with elevated humidity, whether hot or cold. It did it last summer, and blasting the A/C for 30 miles finally got it to cancel again. In winter, it only fails on damp days.

Does anyone know the mechanism that controls the canceling? It's not obvious when looking at the FSM's wiring diagrams.
 

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Hi Bob L.!! I'd almost think it's electrical. I'm not sure how it's all wired up and such, but if it's not working whenever it's humid or slightly damp out, it sounds like there's extra resistance working into it somewhere. Seems to me that all the actual mechanicals are in the turn signal on the dash pod. I'm not sure how it gets a signal from the steering wheel though, i.e. another mechanical part attached to a wire or strictly electrical type connection of some sort. Maybe try swinging by the dealership and seeing if they can pull up an exploded diagram of the system?? Not likely, but maybe...
 

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From the FSM:

AG AND AJ BODIES

After completion of a turn the system is deactivated
automatically. The cancellation switch in the steering
column sends a signal to a remote turn signal switch
in the switch pod to cancel the turn signal function.
As the steering wheel returns to the straight ahead
position from a turn, a cancel cam which is located on
the steering wheel contacts a cancel flipper located on
the cancellation switch. When the flipper is contacted
by the cancel cam in the proper rotational direction,
the cancel switch sends a signal to the remote turn
signal switch.


DUAL-FUNCTION SWITCH TESTS—AG AND AJ
BODIES

To test the cancellation portion of the switch:
(1) Reconnect battery and switch connector (Fig. 5).
(2) Connect voltmeter positive lead (+) to pin 8 and
negative lead (-) to ground.
(3) Place ignition switch to the ON position. Voltmeter
should read battery voltage. If no voltage is
present, check feed wire to pin 8. If battery voltage is
present continue with switch test.
RIGHT CANCELLATION TEST
(1) Connect one side of a jumper wire to pin 3 and
the other end of jumper wire to ground.
(2) Connect the positive lead (+) of a voltmeter to
pin 5 and the negative lead (-) to ground.
CAUTION: Do not allow pin 5 to become grounded
during test, switch failure will result.
(3) With the ignition switch in the ON position,
push the cancellation pawl down and read the voltmeter.
(4) The voltmeter should show at least 9 volts.
(5) If voltage is 0 to 8 volts the cancellation switch
is defective. If voltage is 9 volts or more the cancellation
switch is working correctly.
LEFT CANCELLATION TEST
(1) Connect one side of a jumper wire to pin 4 and
the other end of jumper wire to ground.
(2) Connect the positive lead (+) of a voltmeter to
pin 5 and the negative lead (-) to ground.
CAUTION: Do not allow pin 5 to become grounded
during test, switch failure will result.
(3) With the ignition switch in the ON position,
push the cancellation pawl up and read the voltmeter.
(4) The voltmeter should show at least 9 volts.
(5) If voltage is 0 to 8 volts the cancellation switch
is defective. If voltage is 9 volts or more the cancellation
switch is working correctly.

REMOTE TURN SIGNAL SWITCH TEST—AG
AND AJ BODIES
The remote turn signal switch is located on the left
side of the instrument panel switch pod. To test,
remove switch pod assembly from instrument panel.
Using an ohmmeter, test for continuity between the
terminals of the switch as shown in the following
continuity chart (Fig. 6). The white 7 way connector
next to the 14 way connector must be connected when
performing continuity checks.

CANCELLATION SOLENOID TEST—AG AND AJ
BODIES
To test the turn signal cancellation solenoid:
(1) Remove switch pod from instrument panel.
(2) Connect one end of a jumper wire to the positive
terminal of the battery, the other end to pin 6 of the
turn signal switch 14 way connector.
(3) Place turn signal switch in the left turn mode.
(4) Take a second jumper wire and connect one end
to a good ground. Momentarily touch the other end of
the jumper wire to pin 11 or 14. The solenoid should
energize, and return the switch to its center OFF
position.
(5) Place turn signal switch in the right turn mode.
(6) Repeat step 4. The solenoid should energize,
and return the switch to its center OFF position.
(7) If switch does not return to center in either
direction, the switch is defective.

So in short there is a cancelling switch (the one with the flipper) that tells the cancelling solenoid to turn off the turn signals. It is my understanding that the cancelling switch is the part that fails.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, that's a great help!

Again, it only fails in elevated humidity (and it doesn't have to be swampy, just damp air), and when it fails, both sides fail to cancel. And it hasn't happened for months, but even more rarely, the signal failed to actuate in both directions (and also failed to mechanically cancel when that happened). So it doesn't appear to be a mechanical failure, but an electrical one. I'll be checking all of the solder joints in the pod connectors and the circuit board to the turn signal switch, as well as all contacts.

I should mention that this car does something I've never experienced before: Anytime the ambient temperature is below about 45F, turning the wheel even slightly in either direction results in a horrible groaning sound, coming from directly behind the steering wheel itself, inside the collar that contains the ignition switch. It sounds like a door hinge in a haunted house, or an oar in an oarlock, and it's so loud, it probably can be heard outside the vehicle. Once the cabin temperature exceeds about 45F, it does not occur, ever. It's definitely in the column, just in front of the instrument pod, and not in another part of the steering downstream. I feel the vibration/binding, but no real extra steering effort.

I have a spare steering column from my 1992, and I've been waiting for a summer weekend when I can swap it out. The '92 column has cruise control, and I have everything swapped over for cruise control into the '93 except for the switches on the steering wheel. The reason I didn't do the swap yet is that I have to swap ignition cylinders, so that the car will be keyed the same, all off the same key. I expect this problem will go away, as it never happened with the '92.
 

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I guess you'll find the source of the groaning once you pull the column and have a chance to inspect it more carefully than you can when it's in the car. The column comes out quite easily and the swap shouldn't take you very long. Same thing for the lock cylinder.

You'll should also be able to get a good look at that dual function switch once the column is out or the steering wheel is off. Odds are that your cancelling problem is there since the cancellation switch/pawl should be subject to the most cycles since it's activated every time the steering wheel is turned sufficiently to trigger a cancellation. I would suspect that the cancellation solenoid in the switch itself remains unpowered until the turn signal switch is activated and should have far less duty cycles than that little cam switch. These turn signal/high beam switches always seemed a little delicate and flimsy. They may be constructed ruggedly, but they sure don't feel that way.

With your electrical and troubleshooting experience I'm sure you'll be able to get to the cause of your cancellation issues. I wonder how available a new dual function switch is ? Having a backup or two of the d-f switch and the turn signal switch assembly would be in order since these are such unique and odd parts.
Other than the 90 through 93 LeBarons and the Daytonas I'm not aware of any other manufacturer that used a similar ( and clever, though complicated ) turn signal arrangement. Are you ? It sure seems that Chrysler went to a fair amount of design and manufacturing expense to reinvent the mousetrap just to be different..
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The column from my '92 worked fine, so that will get rid of the groaning. If the cancellation is due to the column end of things, it will fix that, too. I gave my spare pod to another Allpar member a couple of years ago, so I can't replace that. However, since the condition is so sensitive to humidity, my suspicion is that there is residual solder flux on the circuit board or wire connections at the turn signal switch, that is shorting it out as the conductivity changes. I've dealt with that failure mechanism before at work. The fact that it exactly tracks higher humidity supports that theory. Will be removing it to clean it when the weather improves.
 

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That's why I was glad the two LeBarons I had were 1994s. They went back to a conventional turn signal lever on the column then.

The groaning sounds like an issue I had with my 1989 Fifth Avenue. When it was stolen they broek the column and it took a while to find another proper airbag column for it so I ran it for a while with a non-airbag column and it was noisy like yours - though not as loud.
 

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It was NOT the switch. Could have happened in any car.

I pulled the pod, took the integral circuit board off the switch, cleaned out a lot of tin oxide tarnish on the board that the contacts wipe against, and some flux. Put it all back in the car - no turn signals, and on high beam, NO headlights at all. No optical horn.

Fuses were all good. So I brought the pod back inside and started tapping out the signals. That's when I found the root cause of the trouble.

The short wiring harness from the switch goes to a circuit board that mounds in the pod, and in turn connects to the larger left side circuit board that has the headlight switches and panel bulbs. That small circuit board has an 8-pin header connector soldered to it - or should I say, not soldered? As I tapped out the signals with my multimeter with audible continuity beep on, it was intermittent. I was able to rock the connector at least 20 degrees in each direction and break contact with the turn signal switch.

Brought it downstairs to where I have a new workstation at my bench, reflowed all 8 joints (the cracks were all plainly visible) and tested it electrically. Solid.

Put it back in the car, ALL works. Time will tell, but I predict that I will have no more trouble at all with any function in this switch. Since no mechanical stress is placed on this connector other than road vibration, I'm going to state that they were cold solder joints from the factory that all cracked over time. No other connections on that small board were bad.

So if you have similar trouble with the pod, take the switch out and try rocking connector CN2 on the small circuit board. Check its solder joints visually. This defect can kill any and all functions from that switch.

White 8-pin connector:
 

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Bob,

Glad you found the problem and that no hard to get parts were needed for the repair. i too do electronic repairs from time to time and it's not at all unusual to see fractured solder connections on this type of Molex ?? PCB pin connectors. These are used in a lot of audio gear that was US built in the 70's and 80's and I've reflowed lots of these connector pins. I suspect that these joints were probably fine when new but began to fail due to thermal cycling of the various connecting bits over the years ( especially the interior temperature extremes from winter to summer ) in combination with a rather thin and light production line solder application at the joint. These may have even been wave soldered.

In any event, a job well done and duly noted for future reference.
 
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