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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I ran 15% abv fuel the last 2 tanks and it seemed to work extremely well, no loss in power and maybe a slight increase in gas mileage but given that its 20-30c cheaper than $3+ fuel, fuel mileage has to drop by 10%+ to be more $$.

Now I can also find the higher ethanol - I think 40 or 50% (E85 - 51 - 83%) ethanol fuel around my area. Has anyone tried it in a 2001. How did it work.
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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I'd be very leery of using E85 in a fuel system designed for E10. Ethanol is very corrosive and a non-flex fuel vehicle would not have the fuel components specifically designed against the corrosive properties of ethanol. In short - don't use E85 in a 2001 vehicle designed for E10.

It may run, but the fuel system may fail or leak due to the ethanol.

I would use E15 as the highest concentration of ethanol. Certainly not E85.

Flex fuel vehicles usually have a yellow gas cap that has FLEX FUEL printed on it.
 

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I ran 15% abv fuel the last 2 tanks and it seemed to work extremely well, no loss in power and maybe a slight increase in gas mileage but given that its 20-30c cheaper than $3+ fuel, fuel mileage has to drop by 10%+ to be more $$.

Now I can also find the higher ethanol - I think 40 or 50% (E85 - 51 - 83%) ethanol fuel around my area. Has anyone tried it in a 2001. How did it work.

E-85 fuel has about one-third less energy, when compared to standard gasoline. As such, your fuel mileage will drop - which offsets the reduced cost.

As Doug D mentioned, you also run the risk of damage to various components of your vehicle, not designed to operate with E-85 fuel.
 

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E-85 fuel has about one-third less energy, when compared to standard gasoline. As such, your fuel mileage will drop - which offsets the reduced cost.

As Doug D mentioned, you also run the risk of damage to various components of your vehicle, not designed to operate with E-85 fuel.
That can't be. It's only 15% ethanol, not 33%.

It is true enough that if a vehicle is not engineered for e85, and most 2001s are not, there will be problems. But some 2001s are E85 compatible. Owner's manual will reveal the secret.
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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That can't be. It's only 15% ethanol, not 33%.
I think you misread his post. E85 has 85% ethanol. E15 has 15% ethanol. He's referring to E85. not E15. I would expect about a 30% drop in fuel mileage using E85 vs using E10. Ethanol has 30% less BTU's per gallon than gasoline.
 

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I think you misread his post. E85 has 85% ethanol. E15 has 15% ethanol. He's referring to E85. not E15. I would expect about a 30% drop in fuel mileage using E85 vs using E10. Ethanol has 30% less BTU's per gallon than gasoline.
Oh. I did indeed. Sorry. Brain burp. I agree with you, then. I was reacting to “I ran 15% abv fuel ... ” and then I got mixed up.
 

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I considered e85 for performance reasons. It is a big enough change to require a higher flowing fuel pump, larger fuel lines, bigger fuel injectors and an entirely different tune.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I used 15% ethanol gasoline and seemed to have no ill effects, only on my 3rd tank. Well, I'll likely stay with 10$ ethanol regular, or 15% when I can find it. Not go to the higher ethanol fuels.
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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Not go to the higher ethanol fuels.
Unless your vehicle is a Flex Fuel vehicle it advisable to NOT use the higher (E85) fuel. E10 is preferred. My take on E15 is the jury is still out. No one really knows the longer term affect - if any. Time will tell. But, hey, NASCAR is using it (touting it as "Green Fuel"), so it must be okay!?! :rolleyes: :giggle::unsure:
 

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According to the EPA, vehicles built since 2000 'should' be able to tolerate E15.
My older lawnmower isn't bothered by ethanol. My newer lawnmower needs a yearly carburetor service. I now use non-ethanol gasoline in my small engines.

 

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Virginia Gentleman
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According to the EPA, vehicles built since 2000 'should' be able to tolerate E15.
My older lawnmower isn't bothered by ethanol. My newer lawnmower needs a yearly carburetor service. I now use non-ethanol gasoline in my small engines.
After having to have the carburetor replaced on one mower, I stopped using E10. The new mower I bought a few years ago can use E10, but I have used only non-ethanol fuel. I don't recall the owner's manual saying anything about E15,

Older small engines don't have the small ports like the newer ones. The EPA has been cracking down on small engine emissions and to comply the ports have been reduced in size.

Some states have or are considering banning future small engine sales.
 
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