Allpar Forums banner

What Does Charging EV Batteries Cost?

4695 Views 71 Replies 27 Participants Last post by  Tomguy
I read about all the wonderful things about EVs and how they will change everything we know about transportation but, I have not seen any costs associated with EVs except the cost of the actual vehicle.
So... how much DOES it cost to fill up EVs??
1 - 20 of 72 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
2,930 Posts
It changes depending on your electric cost. If you're fast charging like what you would be doing on a road trip it can be anywhere from $10+ Each state has their own laws for if they're allowed to charge per Kw or if they gotta charge per minute. If you have a fast-charging car like the ioniq 5 it would probably be cheaper to charge per minute than per Kw. Per Kbb article on cost of charging at home. It should be noted it can be cheaper or more expensive if you charge at peak times. A lot of power companies will cut a deal with you to charge off of peak hours

“A conservative rule of thumb is that an electric car gets 3 to 4 miles per kWh,” Voelcker says. “So divide the total miles you drive each month by 3 to get the kWh you would use monthly. Multiply that number by your cost per kWh. The dollar amount you get will most likely be lower than what you pay each month to buy gasoline.”
To put this into perspective, let’s give an example. Let’s say you drive about 1,183 miles per month (Americans drive an average of about 14,200 miles annually). For an EV, you will use about 394 kWh in that timeframe. Using the U.S. household average from June 2022 of about 15 cents per kWh, it would cost about $59 per month to charge an electric car.
 

· Registered
2011 Challenger R/T Classic
Joined
·
1,205 Posts
My state is around $0.10 per kWh of electricity. So a Jeep 4xe with a 17 kWh battery costs $1.70 to charge. A full size BEV pickup with a 200 kWh battery would cost $20 to charge. These are at-home figures obviously. Since the range on a BEV pickup is only 50% of what a similar ICE truck gets, you can pretty much say $40 to drive the BEV truck the same distance it'll cost $80 to drive the ICE version.

On the road, public stations sometimes charge much much higher rates, so in that case you're spending MORE money not less to drive the BEV.
 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,338 Posts
My state is around $0.10 per kWh of electricity. So a Jeep 4xe with a 17 kWh battery costs $1.70 to charge. A full size BEV pickup with a 200 kWh battery would cost $20 to charge. These are at-home figures obviously. Since the range on a BEV pickup is only 50% of what a similar ICE truck gets, you can pretty much say $40 to drive the BEV truck the same distance it'll cost $80 to drive the ICE version.

On the road, public stations sometimes charge much much higher rates, so in that case you're spending MORE money not less to drive the BEV.
The highest rates I've seen on the road are 75 cents per kwh. That would be about $45 to 'fill up' a 75kwh battery (since you never charge from 0 to 100%). If that gives you a 250-mile range, it would be 18 cents per mile.
18 cents per mile on gasoline at today's prices of $3.19 per gallon would be equivalent to 18 mpg.

If you were to fill up at home for 20 cents per kwh, which is what we pay, the equivalent of the example above would be $12 to charge fully, and at a 250-mile range, would be 4.8 cents per mile. That translates to 66 mpg, and you're not going to get that in any ICE vehicle.

So the bottom line is, the more you charge at home, the more the BEV beats ICE, by a wide margin. If you always charge on the road, you pay about the same as if you had a large SUV or pickup truck.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
833 Posts
One of the more interesting parts of the Illinois EV regulations passed this year puts the local electrical utility as a 'partner' in any home based charging system. From my understanding a homeowner will have the choice of time-of-day metering (costs more for to charge during peak times) or allow the utility to 'turn-off' the charging stations during peak times.
 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,376 Posts
I charge the Jeeps after 11 pm I pay a penny per kWh. It’s a 15 kWh battery, so 15 cents gets me 21-25 miles. Multiply by two, so it’s less than $10 per month unless I do some off-plan charging which I will do on weekends.
 

· Virginia Gentleman
Joined
·
8,735 Posts
I charge the Jeeps after 11 pm I pay a penny per kWh. It’s a 15 kWh battery, so 15 cents gets me 21-25 miles. Multiply by two, so it’s less than $10 per month unless I do some off-plan charging which I will do on weekends.
Friend of mine has two hybrids - a Volt and a Fusion. Both are plug-in's. When we last talked his monthly electrical bill only went up by $20 to charge both vehicles (240 charger installed in the garage). He commuted 100+ miles per day at the time.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
904 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Friend of mine has two hybrids - a Volt and a Fusion. Both are plug-in's. When we last talked his monthly electrical bill only went up by $20 to charge both vehicles (240 charger installed in the garage). He commuted 100+ miles per day at the time.
It sounds like an EV is relatively a bit cheaper to run than I thought! Now if the purchase price eas reasonable..
 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,376 Posts
It sounds like an EV is relatively a bit cheaper to run than I thought! Now if the purchase price eas reasonable..
The price often isn’t that unreasonable if you get the full $7500 federal tax credit. Of course, that has changed some and will be changing again next year.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zagnut27

· Registered
Joined
·
12,401 Posts
The TFL crew compared a gas Tundra to the Hummer EV towing.

They used a public charger and the cost was the same as to fill up the Toyota, but took a long time.

 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,376 Posts
Public chargers are a gamble. they range from free to way overpriced. here's a guy who modified his Tesla to tow and does long distance towing with the car, covering roughly the same distance per day a gas tow vehicle would.

Too bad the TFL crew hasn't figured a way to power a vehicle with their excessive bloviation. If something can be said in 15 seconds, it takes them 5 minutes.
 

· Administrator
1974 Plymouth Valiant - 2013 Dodge Dart - 2013 Chrysler 300C
Joined
·
25,616 Posts
One other thing to note - there's a wide range of efficiencies from BEVs. A Chevy Bolt will cost much less to operate than a Tesla or (obviously) Hummer BEV because they're relatively fuel-efficient.

Over time these things will settle down. Though on the overpricing of public chargers I just have to say... we have two gas stations across the street. Delta was charging $2.90 and Gulf was charging $3.40 the last time I looked. There was a station on the highway charging $2/gallon above the normal price, which I found suspicious to say the least (especially since it was the Russian oil company).
 

· Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Funny how we get stuck with terms from our past experiences with autos, like "fill-up" when we will have to learn to say charge. I have friends that still say roll down the window, with auto headlights we no longer use the word "dim" the lights. Backup cameras, power mirrors, sun/moon roofs, voice activated radios, nav etc have all played a part in our ever changing world of vehicle words and vocabulary. Would love to be around to see what my grandchildren will say maybe "drive". By the way today they don't understand the word "car key".
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,930 Posts
It sounds like an EV is relatively a bit cheaper to run than I thought! Now if the purchase price eas reasonable..
If you don't need the newest and best tech you can get bolt ev and euv or the leafe for under 30k. You also would get the ev tax credit for many evs this coming year for both new and used. If used you gotta find one under 25k i think it is and one owner
 

· Registered
Joined
·
482 Posts
The majority of people still “roll down” their windows, unless power windows have become standard on all vehicles now. (Some people still “roll down” their air conditioning too…)

That said, you do in fact, still “dim the headlights” if you’re using your brights and encounter oncoming traffic (and if you don’t, you’re not a good driver…). You just do it by pushing or pulling your turn signal arm instead of a floor switch.

Maybe I’m missing something.
 

· Administrator
1974 Plymouth Valiant - 2013 Dodge Dart - 2013 Chrysler 300C
Joined
·
25,616 Posts
@Clinton, he specified automatic headlights presumably meaning auto high beams (which are not necessarily the same thing; I think Chrysler calls auto high beams “SmartBeam”). The car dims them so the driver doesn't.
 

· Registered
2011 Challenger R/T Classic
Joined
·
1,205 Posts
And as is always the case, we have to remember that we are only talking about cost of "fuel" here. In other words, short term costs. If we are to look at long term costs BEVs start to really look poor because a $20k battery replacement destroys any weekly "fuel" savings immediately. They say most BEVs have a 10 year/100k warranty on the battery pack and systems. At 10 years, if an ICE pickup truck has 150k on the clock it's just getting broken in well.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,982 Posts
After 150,000 miles at 18mpg with fuel an average price of $3.50/gallon, the money spent is just over $29,000. You can pay $75/month on charging and break even paying for a new battery.
 
1 - 20 of 72 Posts
Top