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1974 Plymouth Valiant - 2013 Dodge Dart - 2013 Chrysler 300C
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Again, as I've been saying, hydrogen for people who have long commutes, BEV for cities. It's wasteful and foolish to use a BEV on a ranch, to go between lumber mills, etc. It's a bit like the old diesel vs hybrid argument; hybrids are ideal for cities, diesel was ideal for highways. In our own driveway, we have one car I'd always choose for long highway trips (300C) which does 34 mpg easily at 75 with the a/c on; and one for city driving (Dart 1.4) which does 41 highway, if you have a/c off and don't go over 65, but requires premium. Around town the 300’s weight and size are a drawback, and mileage plummets to around 19, while the Dart is nimble and quick enough, and mileage is around 28 (that gap is bigger than it seems due to the weird way mpg, vs ml/km, works).

The problem with gasoline engines is that as motor technology and mass production techniques progress, they are being outclassed for the same price; the expensive part is the batteries or fuel cells. Automakers have more information than we do on cost there. So while 2030 is probably not realistic for gasoline engines to be gone from new cars, I suspect by 2035-2040 there may be one or two automakers left making gasoline engines, while everyone else has moved on because they need the performance. (The government didn't outlaw carburetors, but as fuel injection became more common, nobody would buy a carburetor car; I think Isuzu made the last vehicles with carbs, and they were pickups. Living at the time, I knew a couple of people who demanded carburetors for the repairability, but most people demanded fuel injectors for the predictability, gas mileage, power, and no-maintenance-for-a-hundred-thousand-miles attributes.)

Would you buy a new car with a carburetor for your daily commute?
In 2035, would you buy a gasoline-engined car?

Again, I'm not a big booster of electric cars, I'm just observing what's out there today. My immediate nuclear family has five gasoline powered cars and no hybrids or BEVs.
 

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Again, as I've been saying, hydrogen for people who have long commutes, BEV for cities. It's wasteful and foolish to use a BEV on a ranch, to go between lumber mills, etc. It's a bit like the old diesel vs hybrid argument; hybrids are ideal for cities, diesel was ideal for highways. In our own driveway, we have one car I'd always choose for long highway trips (300C) which does 34 mpg easily at 75 with the a/c on; and one for city driving (Dart 1.4) which does 41 highway, if you have a/c off and don't go over 65, but requires premium. Around town the 300’s weight and size are a drawback, and mileage plummets to around 19, while the Dart is nimble and quick enough, and mileage is around 28 (that gap is bigger than it seems due to the weird way mpg, vs ml/km, works).

The problem with gasoline engines is that as motor technology and mass production techniques progress, they are being outclassed for the same price; the expensive part is the batteries or fuel cells. Automakers have more information than we do on cost there. So while 2030 is probably not realistic for gasoline engines to be gone from new cars, I suspect by 2035-2040 there may be one or two automakers left making gasoline engines, while everyone else has moved on because they need the performance. (The government didn't outlaw carburetors, but as fuel injection became more common, nobody would buy a carburetor car; I think Isuzu made the last vehicles with carbs, and they were pickups. Living at the time, I knew a couple of people who demanded carburetors for the repairability, but most people demanded fuel injectors for the predictability, gas mileage, power, and no-maintenance-for-a-hundred-thousand-miles attributes.)

Would you buy a new car with a carburetor for your daily commute?
In 2035, would you buy a gasoline-engined car?

Again, I'm not a big booster of electric cars, I'm just observing what's out there today. My immediate nuclear family has five gasoline powered cars and no hybrids or BEVs.
There was never a Diesel for sale in the US with an automatic that beat the hybrids.

Cars with best Diesel mileage sold in the US
Cruze 48 hwy 37 combined
Jag XE 42 hwy 36 cmb
328d 43 hwy 36 cmb
Jetta 43 hwy 35 cmb*** didn't actually meet US emissions standards.

Ioniq Blue 60 hwy 59 cmb
Prius Eco 53 hwy 56 cmb
Ioniq 54 hwy 55 cmb
Elantra Blue 56 hwy 54 cmb
Insight 49 hwy 52 cmb
Prius 50 hwy 52 cmb
Corolla hybrid 52 hwy 52 cmb
Camry hybrid LE 53 hwy 52 cmb
Sonata Blue 54 hwy 52 cmb

I would definitely go for a plug in hybrid for 2035, I'm sure not going with hydrogen.

If they had a $15K Dodge Daytona and the cheapest PHEV were still the Ioniq plug in at $27.7K I would have one ICE car and one gas/electric PHEV. Like Tavares says, they need to keep making cheap ICE cars, it is good for the environment.
 
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