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My grand mother had a 60 Ambassador Wagon [ "Cross Country" was what the wagons were called, JavelinAMX ], with the 327/270 HP engine and it would snap your head back when she hit the gas. Even left black rubber in the driveway and on the street.

Love these things. My parent's 72 Ambassador had the 304 which was smooth and economical. Shorter and lighter than the LTD and Impala of the period as well, but with similar interior room. Still a great concept.
The Ambassador; at least 1970 onwards, was a Rebel/Matador with a longer front clip and matching wheelbase. From the A pillar back; it was 'Matador' in dimensions within the same bodystyle.
 

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My grand mother had a 60 Ambassador Wagon [ "Cross Country" was what the wagons were called, JavelinAMX ], with the 327/270 HP engine and it would snap your head back when she hit the gas. Even left black rubber in the driveway and on the street.

Love these things. My parent's 72 Ambassador had the 304 which was smooth and economical. Shorter and lighter than the LTD and Impala of the period as well, but with similar interior room. Still a great concept.
My parents bought an Ambassador Sedan (around that same year, '72 or '73) which was equipped with the 360 CID V8. Nice package with the Chrysler Torque Flight Auto ( AMC called it Torque Command. AMC had gone with Borg-Warner for some years before, and marketed the B-W as 'Shift Command', so the TC name was a logical follow-on for the Chrysler-sourced transmission). However, around the same time they towed a travel trailer with an International-Harvester TravellAll which was powered by an AMC 401 CID V8. And purchased a Dodge half-ton extended cab which was also my father's daily driver. It had it's own niggling situations, but was good basic transpo for years.

But later, they traded for a Dodge Aspen. With that dog ( another lemon ), they were done with Chrysler cars, and didn't re-up with AMC either. Drove the wheels off the Pick-up, and laid that one to rest.

They detoured to GM. First, with an Impala. Lousy car. But then obtained a Buick. And for the remaining 20-odd years of driving that's what they stuck with.
 

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1974 Plymouth Valiant - 2013 Dodge Dart - 2013 Chrysler 300C
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Is there an AMC of today? There are few American independents, little innovation, and little fun coming out of the current auto industry. I guess by default that would make Tesla the AMC of today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
1962 Rambler Classic, courtesy of Old Car Brochures. This was the final year of the "Scene-Ramic" roof introduced in 1956. Starting in '63, the cars had a more contemporary (but less distinctive) roof.

These were the years when George Romney appeared in every brochure (and on TV commercials that I never got to see). He seemed like a reliable guy who was very proud of his work, so I can see why he was able to be elected governor. Rambler brochures can be found under "AMC" in the Old Car Brochures website linked above.

 

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Studebaker made their own engines through the 1964 model year. Starting with the '65 models, they used Chevy engines. They stopped making cars in 1966.

Studebaker Lark - Wikipedia (at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Studebaker_Lark )

Only the straight 6 and the 283 are mentioned. I saw a '66 for sale at a swap meet with a 327, so that engine was apparently supplied, too.
Studebaker never offered the 327 V8. Should have. Would have been just what the Daytona Sport Sedan needed. The 327 used the same block as the 283 so it would have fit in the engine compartment. Studebaker mated the Chevrolet engines to Borg-Warner transmissions.

When the 1965 models introduced Studebaker had a choice of either a 194-cid six or 283 V8. The Chevrolet 240 six was added to the options list in January, 1966.

Bill
Vancouver, BC
 

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I know you meant to type 230 Bill.

Thanks
Randy
 

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I have a '62 Lark Daytona with the 259-2bbl/4-sp. Nice torque for a car that weighs about the same the Caliber.
The Super Lark, Hawk and Avanti could be had with the Paxton supercharged 289 (their own engine, not the Ford 289).
The Granatelli brothers helped develop modify and race them:
http://www.studebaker-info.org/Rseries/R3Misc/R-enghistory.txt
The Studebaker-Packard corporation was in dire financial straits at this time and could not compete with the big 3 (or AMC for that matter). No such thing as a bailout in the early '60's.
They couldn't afford to manufacture their own engines and they limped on until car production ended in Canada in the 1966 m.y.
 

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Studebaker never offered the 327 V8.
I remember the seller claiming that it wasn't a Chevy engine. I couldn't correct him then because I wasn't sure, but all Studebakers had Chevy engines toward the end. Maybe it wasn't original? I also remember that it had "Thunderbolt" on the valve covers, which was the same name that Packard used for their 327 straight 8 with a 4-bbl carb during the '53 and '54 model years (and maybe earlier).
 

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Well, not to state the obvious, but...Chrysler!

I saw an ad last year for the Dodge family of AWD vehicles and it reminded me of the early Eagle lineup when you could get a 2 dr coupe (Spirit based), 4 door sedan (Concord) and Wagon (traditional Eagle) with AWD from AMC. Currently, the same lineup is available from Dodge, with a 2 door (Challenger GT), 4 door sedan (Charger GT) and wagon (Durango) all available with AWD.

JS
 
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