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I changed my first cartridge type oil filter last night after work at around 3 in the morning. Everything seem fine, started it up and no leaks. I'm at the job today and as soon as I notice it I get the ding ding ding on the dash. Check engine light so I check the on board info to find the oil pressure dramatically lower than it should be and wildly fluctuating. I didn't have my tools on me so I dashed to the advance auto down the road only to find out I was down almost 4 quarts of oil.

My drain plug was snug, no leaks there. The system was closed in all the spots I saw so it wasn't any obvious leak. I checked the filter area again and this fondue like film of oil is all around it. I grab a few loaner tools and with a bit of luck I got it out without removing the air box/hose clamp + hose above it. Everything seem fine there. So I screw it back on like I did before, and add oil. I ended up adding one quart or so too much, but I checked leaks again and nothing.

I got home after work and no new oil found where it doesn't belong. I drained the excess and checked to ensure it was now at the correct level.

It cost me in all a bit of hassle, some backed up worked, and 20 bucks... but I'm glad it was me and not my brother having this issue or he would have went until the car stalled.

Oddly enough last night I changed the same filter on my mom's 200 and I just double checked everything, including the dipstick and everything is perfect. How that filter didn't go on correctly I'm not sure... but many can you lose 4 quarts quickly.

Funny part was last night I took the extra time to remove the stuff around it so ensure a proper placement, this time I just found it a spot to go in and now its on 100% correctly. It seemed idiot proof, but I gather it was just one quarter twist wrong or something.
 

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What year, model, and engine for those that are curious?.... and thanks for your report.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
O its the new style oil filter for the pentastar engine. It is all pentastar engines.

Here is the diagram in a Jeep I think; they fit into a black plastic cap and just drop/screw in from above.




You access the 200's oil filter under the big cap to the engine cover, twist off and swap out. Easy access.



However in other applications you may have to (like the van) remove something to access it. Well, I shouldn't say have to as the second time I didn't.
 

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OK, thanks. I guess this all part of an environmental push to reduce the old throw away metal oil filters that end up in the land fills. Cartridges are supposed to be more environmentally friendly, so I've heard.

Wouldn't you drip some oil on the engine as you pull the cartridge out and away?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
John Wood said:
OK, thanks. I guess this all part of an environmental push to reduce the old throw away metal oil filters that end up in the land fills. Cartridges are supposed to be more environmentally friendly, so I've heard.

Wouldn't you drip some oil on the engine as you pull the cartridge out and away?
Yes, it does, but I have my collection pan still under it, which I figure is what most will do due to the drain plug still being under it. Some siphon out oil though as a popular method with these type of filters as they are less likely to want to jack it up if all work can be done up top. Oil analysis from my web searches have shown both methods fine, but I still do the drain plug since I own the equipment and it catches bits of oil.

Other than the hazard of the filter itself, I find the screw on filters much more useful for not losing oil to the ground. If I'm under a vehicle my oil catch is right there and I never miss a drop. The new ones spill a bit if not careful when hot. I found with those last two to twist it almost off, listen for it to drain all the way and then pull it out. It seemed to only allow a few drops to drip down. If one was in a hurry (oil change places) it will likely spill a bit.

The paper ones can be completely burned, but I do question why there isn't a better recycling program for the other filters if they just toss them after you take them to recollection areas. If one is likely to toss their oil filter (Cartridge or not) into the trash, I kind of question if they process their used oil properly.


The few drops are moot, however, after that incident of multiple quarts. At least it was an accident, unlike many who dump it and really damage the environment through the course of their lives.

I would just take caution if it is your first time changing this type of filter and the access is more challenging than just head on. I'm getting a new special socket wrench set soon for issues like this, but it only adds like a minute or two to move the air box duct thing out of the way.

It is good it happened when it did if it were to occur at all, as no harm to the engine was done.
 

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What's old is new again. Cartridge type filters were common on old cars. The 1935 Buick I used to work on had one retrofitted at some point in its life. I beleive it was Chrysler that pioneered the spin on type.
 

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Used to be able to and recommended, a roll of toilet paper as a filter. That's going back a long time ago, 1950s to be sure.
 

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Heh. A friend of mine has some car (I think some model of Nash) that lacks an oil filter entirely. Just have to change the oil often.

Dad's non-Mopar Hyundai Santa Fe is also a cartridge type. I think that the environmental benefit is that you're not throwing away so much metal every time, and you can crush the oil out of the filter element more thoroughly so less ends up in the landfill.

They sell aftermarket cartridge-type-adapters for engines that use a conventional filter; I looked them up once and WOW, they're expensive. Like $200+ for the adapter/housing, and the filters, being proprietary, weren't any cheaper either. I can have a fabricator make an oil filter crusher adapter for my hydraulic press for less than that, to get the oil out of my existing spin-on filters.
 
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